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uncovering-wonders
Photo Credit - DEWLP You can see a pink channel from one area of dark red through blue and into pink again. That is one of the man-made channels recently revealed that is evidence of the fish and eel farming and trapping.

Uncovering wonders

Uncovering wonders

Photo Credit - DEWLP You can see a pink channel from one area of dark red through blue and into pink again. That is one of the man-made channels recently revealed that is evidence of the fish and eel farming and trapping.

At Budj Bim

Laser mapping technology used at the Budj Bim World Heritage site near Portland is revealing eel and fishtraps, and stone huts that have never been recorded before.

The technology, known as Light Detection and Ranging scans through thick scrub and bush to identify and map the terrain, revealing features not seen by the naked eye.

Denis Rose, from the Gunditj Mirring Traditional Owners Aboriginal Corporation, says recent data obtained has helped identify hidden groups of stone hut bases under vegetation and a 115-metre extension of a fish trap complex in the aquaculture system. The technology has helped expand the knowledge about one of the oldest and most extensive aquaculture systems in the world.“The laser mapping technology comes from aerial flyover, the plan flies over the Budj Bim cultural landscape, takes images. One vertically, one horizontally and one diagonally. And then those images are all put together in the computer and then we interpret the data from that.”

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"It’s been really interesting, keep in mind we recently only got access to the data so we ‘re in the very early days about understanding its capabilities. But pretty much we’ve found two cultural heritage sites, two fish traps through the system. One that hadn’t been recorded before and it showed up with this LiDAR imaging. The LiDar actually strips away vegetation … in the computer and you’re left with the ground surface area. Which is really useful in terms of the fish stone traps, and house sites that we can actually identify sites. So we’ve identified one channel within the agriculture system that’s 115meters in length and there’s another channel that we knew of but we didn’t know the scale of. We’d been out there before and it was 162meters in length. Both surprisingly good discoveries for us and so some of the stone hut sites we’ve been able to identify those as well."

"We use it [the data] to identify and confirm where cultural heritage sites may be. Which is the most important part, particularly now that we have World Heritage listing. But we’ve also used it for other purposes. We’ve used it for calculating water flows on some of our wetland that have dried up. Also Parks Victoria are using the imagery to investigate tree health in for the tree gums, for the koala habitat. So checking suitability of habitats for kolas as well.”

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